The voices in my head like to tell dirty jokes ;-)
america-wakiewakie:

San Francisco landlord uses loophole to evict 98-year-old who paid rent on time for 50 years | Raw Story 
A 98-year-old San Francisco woman said this week that she is being evicted from her apartment after 50 years, and she’s never once been late paying her rent.
KRON reported that Urban Green Investments is using the 1986 Ellis Act to kick Mary Phillips out of her apartment so the company can cash in on the surging real estate market in San Francisco. The Ellis Act allows landlords to evict tenants if they are getting out of the rental business.
“I’ve been very happy here,” Phillips explained. “I’ve always paid my rent, I’ve never been late.”

Phillips, who is one of many the low-income families and seniors being evicted, has vowed to fight the eviction because she has nowhere else to go.
“I didn’t sit down and cry, I just refused to believe it,” she said. “They’re going to have to take me out of here feet first.”
“Just because of your age, don’t let people push you around,” she said.
According to the San Francisco Tenants Union, tenants fighting evictions done through the Ellis Act often win their cases.
The group Vanishingsf, which fights the “hyper-gentrification on San Francisco communities,” has encouraged people to protest Phillips’ eviction.
“Who evicts a 98 year old woman?” a post on the Vanishingsf Facebook page asked. “Feel free to let Urban Green CEO David McCloskey, who’s evicting her, know what you think, ask him how he sleeps at night and if he’d put his grandmother on the streets. David@urbangreeninv.com (415) 651-4441 http://www.urbangreeninv.com.”

america-wakiewakie:

San Francisco landlord uses loophole to evict 98-year-old who paid rent on time for 50 years | Raw Story 

A 98-year-old San Francisco woman said this week that she is being evicted from her apartment after 50 years, and she’s never once been late paying her rent.

KRON reported that Urban Green Investments is using the 1986 Ellis Act to kick Mary Phillips out of her apartment so the company can cash in on the surging real estate market in San Francisco. The Ellis Act allows landlords to evict tenants if they are getting out of the rental business.

“I’ve been very happy here,” Phillips explained. “I’ve always paid my rent, I’ve never been late.”

Phillips, who is one of many the low-income families and seniors being evicted, has vowed to fight the eviction because she has nowhere else to go.

“I didn’t sit down and cry, I just refused to believe it,” she said. “They’re going to have to take me out of here feet first.”

“Just because of your age, don’t let people push you around,” she said.

According to the San Francisco Tenants Union, tenants fighting evictions done through the Ellis Act often win their cases.

The group Vanishingsf, which fights the “hyper-gentrification on San Francisco communities,” has encouraged people to protest Phillips’ eviction.

“Who evicts a 98 year old woman?” a post on the Vanishingsf Facebook page asked. “Feel free to let Urban Green CEO David McCloskey, who’s evicting her, know what you think, ask him how he sleeps at night and if he’d put his grandmother on the streets. David@urbangreeninv.com (415) 651-4441 http://www.urbangreeninv.com.”

Feeling defeated

When I am done with school completely at least 5 years away, I want to adopt an “older child” (this term is used for children between the ages 8 to 17 years old). However all the information and “ask yourself before you adopt questions” are all about couples adopting. I honestly do not think that I will get married because of infertility and health issues. Would an older child ever consider being adopted by an awesome woman by herself?

oqos:

surelyyouwillnotdie:

tedx:

In this gut-wrenching talk, Sergeant Andrew Chambers shares the haunting story of his time in Iraq and the tough transition home that landed him in jail. It’s a powerful testimony to the struggle our soldiers face when they come home, and the tragic ways that they can be denied the help they need. 

For any veterans who need help, you can find a list of resources here. Among them, the Wounded Warrior Project does outstanding work with wounded vets. 

For anyone looking to support a veteran, we encourage you to heed Chambers’s advice: "Find a veteran and listen to his story. A lot of us just need somebody to talk to." 

Watch the full talk here.

This is so sad. This is what we do to our veterans these days. We turn our soldiers into hardened warriors, but then we don’t help them turn back into functional adults when they return. Then the warrior in them is set off by some real or imagined threat, and we treat them like criminals. How is that their fault?

Working with people that had PTSD and either had contact with or had been soldiers themselves, I have seen such accounts first hand.
"Your service is a double-edged sword" is a statement I can absolutely get behind. One: Soldiers are necessary. Two: They get educated to behave in a certain way. Three: We wonder why they go off when they don’t receive the proper care after going to war.
This is especially prevalent with British and American soldiers I have met, since they often get thrown into conflicts in which they sooner or later don’t see a reason why they should fight the people that they are there to fight (Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.) - at least that was the common answer I have gotten time and time again.
The problem is, that often soldiers are stylised to be something they usually aren’t. Especially when young people are recruited (and they usually are, since they are easily molded into whatever ideal of a soldier currently exists), they get this idea in their head what they ought to be and what not - and as soon as they are confronted with the harsh realities, because “the enemy” and “we” and “bad” and “good” are not clearly distinguishable, a restlessness takes hold of them.
Of course - they are supposed to be able to kill people. But how do you make someone capable of killing someone?
Three examples, that are the most harmful (especially for civilian contact):
A) Dehumanising  “the enemy”
B) Black and White morality
C) Othering (everyone who is not us is a threat)

Of course, non-symmetrical warfare takes a higher toll, too. When lines cannot be drawn in a clear fashion and insurgency groups hide behind a cover of civilians, a tactic as old as war, there is bound to be confusion. I have seen people afraid of trashcans, because IED used to be hid in the trash where they were deployed.

Armies are places with very strict and often backwards values, a close knit community that has often become scrutinised by the media - or praised to the high heavens (depending on the political connection or how long a war has been running) - and this, too, is very harmful.
Women in the service, don’t ask - don’t tell, “traditional” western clichés of what a man needs to be.. all of this feeds the harmful stereotypes of soldiers that they are tought to mold their life after.
When you learn, that you can only trust the man on your side, how hard do you think it is for the therapist, to get through to a person? Especially when they have learned to bottle their emotional pain up to be “functioning”. No trauma victim has an easy therapy and it’s always painful to access those memories, especially if you have to admit that maybe you might have done something wrong.

States are responsible for their citizens - civilian and military.  And it is a sad statement for every state that does not take proper care of it’s veterans and soldiers (and civvies, too.. because that’s the damn job of states: To take care and protect.) . Not doing so clearly shows, that they are discardable items, that have fulfilled their job.. but they don’t care what happens afterwards.




andrewstuntpilot:

Shakespeare’s Deaths and Murders infographic, by Caitlin Griffin at Drown My Books.

This was sent to me this afternoon by my former English Lit. tutor. File under: classroom wall displays. 

twinpersonalitys:

ironychan:

redcaplf:

… Clockodiles? Is that pun very bad?

CLOCKODILES.

somewhere captain hook is shitting himself

twinpersonalitys:

ironychan:

redcaplf:

… Clockodiles? Is that pun very bad?

CLOCKODILES.

somewhere captain hook is shitting himself

zeldaaloves:

Wondering if Sam and Dean would adopt all the kids they saved… That’d be a totally different show.

babybluesuv:

royonfire:

I present to you a puppy eating watermelon.

I can’t stop thinking about this

dion-thesocialist:

So I’m not very tall (5’ 7”) and sometimes when I see posts where girls are talking shit about short guys and how much they all love tall guys, I feel a twinge of bitterness and think to myself, “I wonder what they’d do if guys all of a sudden started judging them for meaningless physical attributes that they can’t control??”

But then I realize and I’m like ohh, yeah, right, gotcha.

wolvensnothere:

matt112830:

sharplydressedtentacles:

banesidhe:

calming-tea:

samrgarrett:

outofthecavern:

opiatevampire:

theworldisconfused:

In addition to essentially inventing the computer, Alan Turing also broke the German Enigma Code during World War II which paved the way for the D-Day invasion. The man was a hyper-genius. I’ve read descriptions of his work by mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose. He’s been a hero of mine ever since.
The level of thought required to come up with the stuff he came up with is totally beyond my comprehension. I actually did not even know about his orientation until much later. He was prosecuted and ordered to undergo chemical castration. Soon thereafter, he committed suicide by eating a cyanide-laced apple.

The government forced him to take estrogen as a punishment (or “cure”?). He began to develop breasts and other side effects.
He committed suicide by biting into a cyanide laced apple. This is supposedly the inspiration for the name/logo of Apple computers.

omfg
omfg
and old Apple computers
the apple was a rainbow 







Reblogging again because more people need to know about Turing dammit.

Whoa…

History lessons for your eye holes.

wolvensnothere:

matt112830:

sharplydressedtentacles:

banesidhe:

calming-tea:

samrgarrett:

outofthecavern:

opiatevampire:

theworldisconfused:

In addition to essentially inventing the computer, Alan Turing also broke the German Enigma Code during World War II which paved the way for the D-Day invasion. The man was a hyper-genius. I’ve read descriptions of his work by mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose. He’s been a hero of mine ever since.

The level of thought required to come up with the stuff he came up with is totally beyond my comprehension. I actually did not even know about his orientation until much later. He was prosecuted and ordered to undergo chemical castration. Soon thereafter, he committed suicide by eating a cyanide-laced apple.

The government forced him to take estrogen as a punishment (or “cure”?). He began to develop breasts and other side effects.

He committed suicide by biting into a cyanide laced apple. This is supposedly the inspiration for the name/logo of Apple computers.

omfg

omfg

and old Apple computers

the apple was a rainbow 

image

image

image

Reblogging again because more people need to know about Turing dammit.

Whoa…

History lessons for your eye holes.

We took pairs of bad matches and told them they were exceptionally good for each other.

griseus:

Using infrared lighting, a live-streaming, high-definition “turtle webcam" positioned on a beach in the Florida Keys recorded the hatch of about 100 baby loggerhead sea turtles on Friday, July 25, just before 9 p.m.
The 3-inch-long babies erupted from a hole, came out en masse and headed to the Atlantic Ocean under dim moonlight.

The camera uses infrared lighting so hatchlings won’t be confused by artificial light and will go to sea — guided by moonlight reflecting on the water — instead of pushing further onto land.

sixpenceee:

And here they are:
Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.
Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 
Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 
Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 
Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 
Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.
Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

And here they are:

Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.

Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 

Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 

Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 

Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 

Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.

Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).

SOURCE

educatedtodeath:

#revolution #fascism #satire #edchat


The best thing about standardized tests is they take the guess work out of teaching. I know exactly what to teach and to what extent. I don’t have to worry about teaching in wasteful creative ways, nor do I have to worry about inspiring my students. All I…

gjmueller:

THIS